Little Mountain Park Conservancy       Group Inc.

For The Love of Our Park
 
 
 

 

 


 
 
 
 
2020

02/01/20

City of Winnipeg - Public Engagement News Coming up in 2020
Happy new year! Here are some upcoming projects and phases of engagement planned for in 2020. We hope you'll join us!
Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project Phase 3
Phase 3 of the Transit Master Plan
Urban Forest Strategy *new
Next phase of Moving on Marion
Lord Roberts Community Traffic Study Phase 3
Residential Infill Strategy Design Guidelines Round 2
Transportation Master Plan 2050 *new
Winnipeg Recreation and Parks Strategies Phase 2
Residential Food Waste Collection Pilot Program *new

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New Year, New Look, New Opportunities

Take a moment to register for engage.winnipeg.ca (or en français at participe.winnipeg.ca). Registering for Engage Winnipeg allows us to keep you updated on projects that matter most to you as we transition towards this platform for online engagement and updates. The one-time registration process is short and doing so will give you access to all discussion forums, surveys, polls, and other input opportunities.

We will be using this new online engagement platform more and more in 2020 so stay tuned for ways to be part of this online community.
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How can we help?

Did you know there are a number of ways we can accommodate those who may need alternative access to engagement or information? Some of the ways we an help include:
Accepting feedback submissions by telephone survey;
Offering American Sign Language at in-person events;
Offering tactile maps and/or images.
Visit winnipeg.ca/public engagement for the full list. We strive to reduce barriers to participating in public engagement opportunities in a number of ways. If you are ever unsure of how to get involved or are having trouble accessing an engagement opportunity, please contact us at 204?986?4243 or City-Engage@winnipeg.ca.
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We look forward to another year of connecting with you and hearing about
your community and what you value most.


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01/29/20

The board members of Little Mountain Park Dog Club (LMPDC) were daily users of the park. We formed in 2012 and incorporated in 2013 in response to a threat to the park when plans were released showing that an extension to Chief Peguis Trail was going to bisect the park and eliminate the official off leash space. This was planned in order to benefit the growing Centreport inland port project being promoted by the provincial government. Learning that we could only be recognized and interact with the City (as owners of the land) by incorporating, we did so and worked to establish links with city council members and city employees.

For seven years, we worked directly and also as founding members of the Winnipeg Network of Dog Owner Groups (WINDOG). The planned route for Chief Peguis was modified to preserve the park and raised the possibility of increasing the footprint of the park in time. Winter garbage removal, City trail clearing, and improved Richardson ground squirrel remediation all became part of the efforts to improve the park for dog walkers. Through WINDOG efforts were made to elevate the status of dog walking as a desirable activity to be promoted and spaces preserved and increased.

As happens in life, the members of the board have found themselves with other commitments and obligations and club activities could no longer be prioritized. Fortunately, there is another group with similar goals that continues. Having two groups was sometimes counter-productive and it became clear that the park does not require two advocacy groups.

As a non-profit, we are required upon dissolution to disburse the clubs assets to a like-minded organization. We have selected Little Mountain Park Conservancy Group. They have agreed to accept the funds accumulated through fund raising for park use, and the event canopy will be donated to WINDOG.

We treasure the park and the fantastic experience we’ve had through club activities and we wish the current organization much success.

Hi Jordan:

We are sorry to hear that LMPDC efforts are coming to a close. However, we completely understand how priorities change in life – I think it was John Lennon who said that “life is what happens when you are busy making other plans”. We thank you for all of the important work you both did for the park and appreciate your strong voice in dealing with the City regarding park issues.

We will gratefully accept the club funds. Rest assured, we will make sure they are put to good use for the park. We will certainly post your notice on our Facebook page for the Conservancy Group and also the LMPPOA website.

We hope you had a wonderful Christmas and New Year and are looking forward to life’s adventures in the coming year. If you ever have any questions or concerns regarding the park, please feel free to contact us. We will be more than happy to fill you in to what is going on. Hopefully, we will see you around the park from time to time.

Take care,

Lloyd


Update and Reminder

Join the Save Our Canopy email campaign by calling on the Mayor and Councillors to increase the forestry budget by $7.61 million, the shortfall identified by the Parks and Open Space Division in 2019.

 

Thank you if you already sent a letter - You can still send a reminder - The letters sent did make an impact

 

The “$7.61 million” request for the urban forest  budget was specifically acknowledged at the Standing Policy Committee on Protection, Community Services and Parks (Dec 4, 2019) where it was recommended “to the Budget Working Group that it be considered during the preparation of the 2020-2023 Multi Year Budget”.

The job is not finished as the $7.61 million request for the urban canopy must make it to the final budget.

 

Important Dates -

 

Friday, March 6 – 1:30 pm

Draft budget will be released at Executive Policy Committee Meeting (including urban forestry budget) (More info here). Opportunity to see if $7.61 million is in the forestry budget.

 

Friday, March 13, 2020 – 9:30 am

Standing Policy Committee on Protection, Community Services and Parks (Forestry) – Opportunity for public to speak. Register by 4:30pm the day before the meeting.

 

Thursday, March 19, 2020 – 9:00 am
Executive Policy Committee Meeting (Special Meeting)  - Opportunity for public to speak
 

What you can do:

Go to https://saveourcanopy.com/ to email Mayor Bowman and your councillor (If you already emailed a letter you could send a personal reminder).
Share the email on social media, using the hashtags #saveourcanopy, #winnipegpoli and #winnipeg.
Share this email directly with as many contacts as possible.

The more people we have reaching out to our elected officials, the louder our voice for Winnipeg’s trees will be. The importance of trees is recognized as being of value to Winnipeggers from all areas of the city.

Thank you for your help on this urgent issue.
 

Ron Mazur

Pam Lucenkiw

Co-Chairs, OURS-Winnipeg

Facebook @OURS_Winnipeg  OURS-Winnipeg.com


Good morning Lloyd,

 

I’m responding to an email inquiry you sent earlier this month about the Chief Peguis Extension West Preliminary Design Study. My apologies for the delay, however the project you’re looking into completed preliminary design in 2018. In direct response to your question, there are no plans for further meetings on this project. To share a little more about the project status, there are no current plans to proceed with further design and construction at this time. The project is currently  on the City of Winnipeg’s Unfunded Major Capital Projects list which can be viewed here: https://winnipeg.ca/infrastructure/major-capital-project-oversight/unfunded-major-capital-projects.stm#6

 

If you would like to review the preliminary design and the public engagement report please visit winnipeg.ca/chiefpeguistrail

 

Please let us know if there is a specific piece of information you’re looking for and we will do our best to help.

 

Thanks,

 


Natalie Geddes

Public Engagement Officer
Office of Public Engagement

Customer Service and Communications
Telephone: 204-451-1841

Email: nataliegeddes@winnipeg.ca
Website: winnipeg.ca

Address: 4th Floor , 510 Main St., Winnipeg, MB R3B 1B9


Rules Apr. 11 2020

Hi all, I asked City council about the social distancing rules and here was their response

Good morning Councillor

People will be required to maintain social distance and will not be able to gather in groups of more than 10. That will also apply in dog parks and in places like Little Mountain.

Thanks.

Felicia Wiltshire
Director, Customer Service & Communications
Customer Service & Communications
City of Winnipeg


June 10 2020


Hope you are out enjoying Little Mountain Park.


The following is some info we came across in the Agenda for the Protection, Community Services and Parks. There are three agenda items (5, 6, & 7) related to parks, trees and greenspace which may be of interest to you and Little Mountain Park Group as reference material.


The meeting at City Hall is tomorrow June 10 http://clkapps.winnipeg.ca/dmis/ViewDoc.asp?DocId=19963&SectionId=&InitUrl= It can be viewed live or just read the reports


Agenda item #5 Winnipeg Tree Canopy
Agenda item # 6 List of parks and natural areas to be protected.

It is anticipated this report and recommendations will pass on June 10.
The province makes the final decision as to what to include for protection.
There is some good language in the documents about protecting natural areas and alignment with city planning documents and climate action plan. (too bad the acres of protected areas weren't provided).


"Pathway to Canada Target 1" is referenced in the parks preservation document. It is found at https://www.conservation2020canada.ca/home "One with Nature: A Renewed Approach to Land and Freshwater Conservation" A Report of Canada’s Federal, Provincial and Territorial Departments Responsible for Parks, Protected Areas, Conservation, Wildlife and Biodiversity

Jointly developed by federal, provincial and territorial governments.


A useful reference for all the groups looking at protecting greenspace and corridors in and around the city.


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Agenda item #7 re agreement with Tree Canada for the million tree challenge.

Pam

If you haven't watched it yet they start discussing parks at 2:38 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOUhLP9dCGg


Is it time for an urban forest bylaw? - Winnipeg Free Press
Michele Kading 2016 The Lance

https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/our-communities/lance/correspondent/Is-it-time-for-an-urban-forest-bylaw-403408106.html





Parks are for nature, not profit

Our provincial parks need your love and attention like never before.

The Manitoba government is looking for ways to privatize and divest from provincial parks at a time when we need them most. This Request for Proposal is asking a consultant to examine 76 Manitoba provincial parks and build a business case for parks while examining privatization and divestment — and building amusement parks.

Parks are not a business model.


Write now to protect our parks!




Divesting, privatizing, monetizing parks is a dereliction of duty from Premier Brian Pallister’s Progressive Conservative government. And hiring a consultant to do it, while axing the staff in Manitoba’s Conservation and Climate Department who know how parks need to be expanded is incredibly insulting and demoralizing.

This is the worst idea I have seen in my 16 years with the Wilderness Committee. In fact, this is the first time since the Manitoba government signed on to an international agreement to protect nature and biodiversity in 1992 that we are actively moving away from that goal.

Our parks have taken care of us during a time of profound need: the COVID-19 pandemic and our physically-distanced summer. And we’ll rely heavily on them next summer too. This is just one of the many benefits of having parks. Parks help the climate, preserve biodiversity, and keep us healthy — all for very little cost or effort.

Write Now!


Please write a letter right now to protect our parks. Manitobans do not want privatization. We want increased staffing, increased funding, increased services and more parks. This is the future that scientists tell us we need. Let’s not deny parks the care they need.

For the wild,



Donate | Volunteer | Take Action


Dec. 03 2020

Here is another historical document on parks development that is terrific.
.sent to me by our local history buff, Barb Bristow.
.
>
> https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/uhr/1982-v11-n1-uhr0870/1019065ar.pdf
>


Dec. 05 2020

Urban Trees and Human Health: A Scoping Review
Kathleen L. Wolf 1,*, Sharon T. Lam 2, Jennifer K. McKeen 3 , Gregory R.A. Richardson 4, Matilda van den Bosch 5,6 and Adrina C. Bardekjian 7


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4371; doi:10.3390/ijerph17124371

Published: 18 June 2020. sharon.lam@mail.utoronto.ca
jmckeen@ualberta.ca
gregory.richardson@canada.ca
matilda.vandenbosch@ubc.ca
abardekjian@treecanada.ca
* Correspondence: kwolf@uw.edu


Abstract: The urban forest is a green infrastructure system that delivers multiple environmental, economic, social and health services, and functions in cities. Environmental benefits of urban trees are well understood, but no review to date has examined how urban trees affect human health. This review provides a comprehensive summary of existing literature on the health impacts of urban trees that can inform future research, policy, and nature-based public health interventions. A systematic search used keywords representing human health, environmental health, and urban forestry. Following screening and appraisal of several thousand articles, 201 studies were conceptually sorted into a three-part framework. Reducing Harm, representing 41% of studies, includes topics such as air pollution, ultraviolet radiation, heat exposure, and pollen. Restoring Capacities, at 31%, includes attention restoration, mental health, stress reduction, and clinical outcomes. Building Capacities, at 28%, includes topics such as birth outcomes, active living, and weight status. The studies that were reviewed show substantial heterogeneity in purpose and method yet indicate important health outcomes associated with people’s exposure to trees. This review will help inform future research and practice, and demonstrates why urban forest planning and management should strategically promote trees as a social determinant of public health.


Dec. 16 2020

Good day all. Did a quick search regarding Vancouver’s ‘equity of access goals’ from the comment made on Monday’s Zoom call and put into the meeting minutes. The first link

https://vancouver.ca/people-programs/equity-diversity-inclusion.aspx is from Vancouver’s Healthy City Strategy. This has several categories from anti-racism, multiculturalism, handicap accessibility, etc., but two categories related directly to the environment: 1) Active living and getting outside – goal – all Vancouverites are engaged in active living and have incomparable access to nature, and the target – all Vancouver residents live within a five minute walk of a park, and increase the rate of people meeting Canadian physical activity guidelines by 25%; and 2) Environments to thrive in – goal Vancouverites have the right to a healthy environment and equitable access to liveable environments in which they can thrive, and target – Add a biodiversity target and a target related to toxins prevention to the Greenest City Action Plan, and increase neighbourhood Walk Scores.

The second link https://thecityfix.com/blog/equitable-access-open-space-vancouver-plan-katherine-howard-kurt-culbertson/ is an article on More Equitable Access to Open Space? Vancouver Has A Plan For That. This is related to issues understood from COVID-19, and how city planners and builders need to reduce inequities between city areas. The article noted residents were clear that access to nature and green space close to home is important. The city approved a 2019 VanPlay Plan to have equity, asset needs, and connectivity between park and recreational areas. VanPlay seems to be a mixture of park planning and other open spaces. However, it still looks more focussed on parks and athletic recreational areas. I am not sure that this fits a true holistic Greenspace approach, but it is a good reference for needing Greenspaces close to where people live, especially those in lower income neighbourhoods.


Dec. 17 2020

Urban green spaces and health

A review of evidence. 2016

Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2016. © World Health Organization 2016

EDITORS:

Andrey I. Egorov 1, 2 *, Pierpaolo Mudu 1, Matthias Braubach 1 and Marco Martuzzi 1

1 World Health Organization, European Centre for Environment and Health, Bonn, Germany

2 United States Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Chapel Hill, N.C.


Concluding statement from this document:


A city of well?connected, attractive green spaces that offer safe opportunities for urban residents for active mobility and sports as well as for stress recovery, recreation and social contact, is likely to be more resilient to extreme environmental events, such as heat waves (due to the mitigation of urban heat island effect) and extreme rainfall (due to reduced surface run?off). Such a city is also likely to have healthier citizens, reducing demands on health services and contributing to a stronger economy.


https://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/321971/Urban-green-spaces-and-health-review-evidence.pdf


Primary authors


Section 2:

Catharine Ward Thompson and Eva Silveirinha de Oliveira

OPENspace Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom


Section 3:

Benedict W. Wheeler and Michael H. Depledge

European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, United Kingdom


Section 4:

Matilda Annerstedt van den Bosch

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Alnarp, and Lund University, Sweden


(Other contributors... contributed their expertise to the development of recommendations on health?relevant WHO indicators of urban green space and commented on the draft report.)


Table of contents

1. INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................. 1

2. EVIDENCE ON HEALTH BENEFITS OF URBAN GREEN SPACES ............................................................. 3

2.1 Definitions of urban green space ................................................................................................. 3

2.2 Pathways linking urban green space to improved health and well?being.................................... 3

2.2.1 Overview of pathways to health ........................................................................................... 3

2.2.2 Improved relaxation and restoration .................................................................................... 4

2.2.3 Improved social capital ......................................................................................................... 5 2.2.4 Improved functioning of the immune system ....................................................................... 5

2.2.5 Enhanced physical activity, improved fitness and reduced obesity ...................................... 5

2.2.6 Anthropogenic noise buffering and production of natural sounds ....................................... 7

2.2.7 Reduced exposure to air pollution ........................................................................................ 8

2.2.8 Reduction of the urban heat island effect............................................................................. 8

2.2.9 Enhanced pro?environmental behaviour .............................................................................. 8

2.2.10 Optimized exposure to sunlight and improved sleep.......................................................... 9

2.3 Evidence of health benefits of green spaces................................................................................ 9

2.3.1 Improved mental health and cognitive function ................................................................... 9

2.3.2 Reduced cardiovascular morbidity...................................................................................... 10

2.3.3 Reduced prevalence of type 2 diabetes .............................................................................. 11

2.3.4 Improved pregnancy outcomes .......................................................................................... 11

2.3.5 Reduced. mortality..................................................................................................11

2.4 Mechanisms of potential pathogenic effects of green spaces ................................................... 12

2.4.1 Increased exposure to air pollutants................................................................................... 12

2.4.2 Risk of allergies and asthma ................................................................................................ 12 2.4.3 Exposure to pesticides and herbicides ................................................................................ 12

2.4.4 Exposure to disease vectors and zoonotic infections.......................................................... 13

2.4.5 Accidental injuries .................................................................................................. 13

2.4.6 Excessive exposure to UV radiation .................................................................................... 13

2.4.7 Vulnerability to crime.......................................................................................................... 13 2.5 Characteristics of urban green space associated with specific health benefits or hazards........ 14

2.5.1 Perceptions of green space accessibility and quality .......................................................... 14

2.5.2 Size of green space.......................................................................................................15 2.5.3 Presence of specific facilities for certain activities .............................................................. 15

2.5.4 Tree cover and canopy density ........................................................................................... 15

2.6 Differential health benefits of green spaces in specific population groups ............................... 16

2.6.1 Women.............................................................................................16

2.6.2 Children and adolescents .........................................................................................17

2.6.3 Older adults.................................................................................................... 17

2.6.4 Deprived subpopulations and minority groups ................................................................... 18

2.6.5 Populations of various countries and geographic regions................................................... 19

2.7 Co?benefits of urban green spaces unrelated to health effects ................................................. 19

3. INDICATORS OF URBAN GREEN SPACE AVAILABILITY, ACCESSIBILITY AND USAGE,.......AND ASSESSMENT OF THEIR HEALTH RELEVANCE ............................................................................... 21

3.1 Classification of urban green space indicators ........................................................................... 21


3.2 Green space characteristics that can be incorporated in definitions of indicators .................... 21

3.3 Indicators of green space availability ......................................................................................... 22

3.3.1 Greenness, measured by Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) ........................ 22

3.3.2 Density or percentage of green space by area .................................................................... 23

3.3.3 Measures of street trees and other streetscape greenery.................................................. 24

3.4 Indicators of green space accessibility ....................................................................................... 25

3.4.1 Proximity to an urban park or geographically defined green space.................................... 25

3.4.2 Proportion of green space or greenness within a certain distance from residence............ 26

3.4.3 Perception?based measures of green space accessibility ................................................... 27

3.5 Indicators of green space usage..............................................................................................28

3.6 Summary and recommendations for a health?relevant approach to selecting and using indicators of urban green space ...................................................................................... 29

3.6.1 Summary of considerations for selecting indicators ........................................................... 29

3.6.2 Recommendations for a primary indicator ......................................................................... 30

3.6.3 Recommendations for secondary indicators....................................................................... 31

4. PROPOSED INDICATOR AND A DATA ANALYSIS TOOL KIT................................................................ 32

4.1. Summary of indicator development and evaluation................................................................. 32

4.2. Data requirements for a WHO Urban Green Space Indicator ................................................... 33

4.2.1. Land use data for EU countries .......................................................................................... 33

4.2.2. Land cover/use data for non?EU countries......................................................................... 34

4.2.3 Population data................................................................................................... 34

4.3. Methodology............................................................................... 34

4.3.1 General overview ............................................................................................. 34

4.3.2 Basic method....................................................................................................................... 36

4.3.3. Complex method................................................................................................................ 38

4.4 Summary of the proposed indicator .......................................................................................... 39

CONCLUSIONS..........................................................................40
6.LITERATURE.....................................................................................42


APPENDIX 1. Examples of definitions related to assessing green space availability or accessibility .... 64

APPENDIX 2. The availability of key urban land use data for the Member States of the WHO European Region ......................................................................................... 65

APPENDIX 3: A tool kit for assessing green space accessibility – detailed step?by?step procedure..... 67


Dec. 20 2020

Preventive Medicine. (Child health)

Volume 141, December 2020, 106265


Association of neighborhood parks with child health in the United States


AaronReuben. George W.Rutherford. JamezeJames. NooshinRazani


https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2020.106265